World Student Protests Escalate in Mexico After Cartel Leader’s Arrest

Student Protests Escalate in Mexico After Cartel Leader’s Arrest

Demonstrators protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. Investigators determined that 28 sets of human remains recovered from a mass grave discovered last weekend outside Iguala, in Guerrero state, were not those of any of the youths who haven't been seen since being confronted by police in that city Sept. 26.
Demonstrators protest the disappearance of 43 students from the Isidro Burgos rural teachers college in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 17, 2014. Investigators determined that 28 sets of human remains recovered from a mass grave discovered last weekend outside Iguala, in Guerrero state, were not those of any of the youths who haven’t been seen since being confronted by police in that city Sept. 26.

The resort city of Acapulco became the center of student protests on Saturday after Mexican police arrested the leader of the Guerreros Unidos criminal group accused of students’ disappearance.

Students have taken to streets Saturday morning after Mexican police announced the arrest of Sidronio Casarrubias Salgado, the top leader of the Guerreros Unidos criminal cartel, La Vanguardia newspaper reported Saturday.
According to the statement issued by the Mexican police late Friday, Salgado was accused of being behind the disappearance of 43 students in the Mexican state of Guerrero suspected to be kidnapped and murdered.
The students, from the Ayotzinapa Teacher Training College, went missing on September 27, and were last seen being forced into police vans after police opened fire on the students, who were using hijacked buses, killing six.
So far, 22 police officers have been detained in relation to the incident, while Iguala’s mayor and police chief, Jose Luis, wanted for questioning, appear to have gone into hiding, according to state prosecutors.
The Mexican government has offered a reward of $75,000 for any information leading to the students’ whereabouts.
Anti-government rallies have been held in several Mexican cities since the students’ disappearance.
Previous articleAbu Sayyaf hostages arrive at German embassy in Manila
Next article

1 COMMENT

Comments are closed.