Uncategorized Second in Command of Burkina Faso’s Presidential Guard Assumes Power

Second in Command of Burkina Faso’s Presidential Guard Assumes Power

 

Burkina Faso's new interim leader Gen. Honore Nabere Traore, third from left in front, speaks during a press conference held in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. President Blaise Compaore stepped down Friday, pushed from power in Burkina Faso after 27 years by a burst of violent protests that set the parliament ablaze and refused to accept anything short of resignation. (AP Photo/Theo Renaut)
Burkina Faso’s new interim leader Gen. Honore Nabere Traore, third from left in front, speaks during a press conference held in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Friday, Oct. 31, 2014. President Blaise Compaore stepped down Friday, pushed from power in Burkina Faso after 27 years by a burst of violent protests that set the parliament ablaze and refused to accept anything short of resignation. (AP Photo/Theo Renaut)

The second in command of Burkina Faso’s presidential guard, Colonel Isaac Zida, assumed power as the head of state on Saturday, following violent protests over the country’s President Blaise Compaore’s attempt to extend his 27-year rule, the SBS News reported.

“I now assume… the responsibilities of head of the transition and of head of state to assure the continuation of the state,” Zida was quoted as saying in a televised speech by the news outlet, adding that he assured a «smooth democratic transition».
Zida also told reporters that the ousted President Compaore and his chief of staff were «in a safe place and their safety and well-being are assured.”
Zida’s claims to power came after similar claims were made on Friday by the army chief, Nabere Honore Traore, following an announcement by Compaore that the presidency was vacant and urging elections within 90 days.
However, Zida dismissed chief Honore’s claim, who is seen as a close ally to the ousted president. According to the news outlet, Zida referred to the chief’s claim as “obsolete”.
The protests began on Thursday when lawmakers prepared to amend the constitution to allow the 63-year-old Compaore to contest in November 2015 elections. The protesters set the parliament building in the capital Ouagadougou on fire.
Meanwhile, the international community is urging the country to avoid further violence and facilitate a peaceful and democratic transfer of power.
“We reiterate our call for all parties to follow the constitutionally mandated process for the transfer of power and holding of democratic elections,” US State Spokesperson Jen Psaki said in an official statement on the department’s website on Friday.
The protests have killed about 30 people and injured a hundred, but since the ousted president announced his resignation, calm was restored in the country.
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