Uncategorized Germanwings: European airlines place ‘rule of two’ on cockpits

Germanwings: European airlines place ‘rule of two’ on cockpits

 A view of the cockpit of the Germanwings A320 plane at the airport in Düsseldorf a day or so before the crash.
A view of the cockpit of the Germanwings A320 plane at the airport in Düsseldorf a day or so before the crash.

(AA) – In a response to the Germanwings crash, international airlines and regulators on Friday said they would impose a rule requiring two crew members to always be in cockpit.

“Easyjet can confirm that it will change its procedure,” the airline said in a statement on Friday. 

The U.K. Civil Aviation Authority told the press that it was reconsidering its regulation of these procedures.

 The co-pilot of the Germanwings plane first locked his colleague out of the cockpit, and then deliberately crashed the plane alone into the French Alps on Tuesday, killing all 150 on board, the French prosecutor responsible for the investigation said on Wednesday.

Norwegian Air Shuttle also said on Thursday that the airline would bring a new rule for this procedure into effect “without delay.”

The Canadian Aviation Authority has asked all UK carriers to review procedures. “Following the details that have emerged regarding the tragic Germanwings incident, we are coordinating closely with colleagues at the European Aviation Safety Agency and have contacted all U.K. operators to require them to review all relevant procedures,” a spokesman said on Friday.

The U.S. has strict rules about presence in the cockpit. 

“When one of the pilots exits the cockpit for any reason, another qualified crew member must lock the door and remain on the flight deck until the pilot returns to his or her station,” the Federal Aviation Administration said in a written response to questions raised by the French disaster. “A qualified crew member could be a flight attendant or a relief pilot serving as part of the crew,” it also said.

But Europe doesn’t impose the same regulation. A spokesman for the European Aviation Safety Agency in Cologne said in an interview that there’s no regulatory requirement in Europe for a cabin crew member to be present in the cockpit when one of the pilots leaves. 

EASA doesn’t commit to reviewing the regulation. The agency said that it had two investigators working with French police at the scene of the accident, and that it would draw conclusions later.

Lufthansa declined to comment on the rule change.