World Residents of 5 states risk penalties over 9/11 Real ID law

Residents of 5 states risk penalties over 9/11 Real ID law

Vehicles drive in and out of Lancer Gate at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Oklahoma residents are among those in several states who soon may be required to shell out $110 to buy a passport in order to board a commercial flight or enter federal facilities because of their states’ refusal to comply with national proof-of-identity requirements.
Vehicles drive in and out of Lancer Gate at Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. Oklahoma residents are among those in several states who soon may be required to shell out $110 to buy a passport in order to board a commercial flight or enter federal facilities because of their states’ refusal to comply with national proof-of-identity requirements.

Residents of five states may be barred from boarding a commercial flight using a driver’s license as photo ID beginning in 2018 because of their states’ refusal to comply with national proof-of-identity requirements.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security confirmed Wednesday that it notified Oklahoma, Kentucky, Maine, Pennsylvania and South Carolina that requests for extensions to comply with the federal Real ID Act had been denied. The law passed in 2005 and imposes tougher requirements for proof of legal U.S. residency in order for state driver’s licenses to be valid for federal purposes.

Three other states already have been notified that they are not in compliance with federal law.

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