Photo Gallery Europe’s largest underground lake Seegrotte

Europe’s largest underground lake Seegrotte

A visitor at the the entrance of a 445 meters long tunnel in Seegrotte, Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.

Visitors walk through the 445 meters long tunnel in Seegrotte, Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
Mine worker mannequins are seen at the 445 meters long tunnel in Seegrotte, Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
An inside view of the Seegrotte in Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
An inside view of the Seegrotte in Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
An inside view of the Seegrotte in Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
An inside view of the Seegrotte in Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.

A boat at the Seegrotte in Vienna, Austria on February 22, 2018. Seegrotte, the largest European underground lake exists due to a misplaced underground blasting operation in the gypsum mine in 1912. More than 20 million litres of water flooded the underground level of the mine. During WW2, Seegrotte was used by the German army as an underground aircraft factory. After the war, Seegrotte was reopened as a tourist attraction until nowadays.
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